Berkeley Arts Festival Calendar

02/21/2019

Arif Anwar | The Storm: A Novel

Arif Anwar, Author\
Sanchita Saxena, Director, Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies; Executive Director, Institute for South Asia Studies

The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies at UC Berkeley is honored to welcome Dr. Arif Anwar, author of The Storm, a novel that covers fifty years of Bangladeshi history in five love stories.

<b>Abut the Book</b>
Inspired by the 1970 Bhola Cyclone, in which half a million people perished overnight, The Storm seamlessly interweaves five love stories that, together, chronicle fifty years of Bangladeshi history.

Shahryar, a recent Ph.D. graduate and father of nine-year-old Anna, must leave the US when his visa expires. As father and daughter spend their last remaining weeks together, Shahryar tells Anna the history of his country, beginning in a village on the Bay of Bengal, where a poor fisherman and his Hindu wife, who converted to Islam out of love for him, are preparing to face a storm of historic proportions. Their story intersects with those of a Japanese fighter pilot, a British female doctor stationed in Burma during World War II, a Buddhist monk originally from Austria, and a privileged couple in Calcutta who leave everything behind to move to East Pakistan following the Partition of India. The structure of this riveting novel mimics the storm itself - building to a series of revelatory and moving climaxes as it explores the many ways in which families love, betray, honor, and sacrifice for one another.

At once grounded in history and fantastically imaginative, The Storm is a sweeping epic in the tradition of Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner and Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance by an immensely talented new voice in international fiction.

<b>About the Author</b>
Arif Anwar was born in Chittagong, Bangladesh, just miles from the Bay of Bengal. He previously worked for BRAC, one of the world's largest non-governmental organizations, on issues of poverty alleviation, and for UNICEF Myanmar on public health issues. Arif has a PhD in education from the University of Toronto. He currently lives in Toronto with his wife, Si (Sandra) Lian. The Storm is his first novel.

<b>NOTE</b>
This event is taking place in conjunction with the 2nd Chowdhury Center-LSE Bangladesh Summit on Friday, Feb 22, 2019. Please click HERE for further details.
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Established in 2013 with a generous gift from the Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies at UC Berkeley champions the study of Bangladesh's cultures, peoples and history. The first of its kind in the US, the Center's mission is to create an innovative model combining research, scholarships, the promotion of art and culture, and the building of ties between institutions in Bangladesh and the University of California.

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For DIRECTIONS to the Center please enter "Institute for South Asia Studies" in your google maps or click this GOOGLE MAPS LINK. The Chowdhury Center is housed within the Institute.

PARKING INFORMATION
Please note that parking is not always easily available in Berkeley. Take public transportation if possible or arrive early to secure your spot.

The event is FREE and OPEN to the public.

Feb 21, 5pm to 7pm, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) Stephens Hall

Poetry at Pegasus: GennaRose Nethercott and Miriam Bird Greenberg

Poets GennaRose Nethercott and Miriam Bird Greenberg read from their respective works.

GennaRose Nethercott's book The Lumberjack's Dove (Ecco/HarperCollins) was selected by Louise Glück as a winner of the National Poetry Series for 2017. She is also the lyricist behind the narrative song collection Modern Ballads, and is a Mass Cultural Council Artist Fellow. Her work has appeared widely in journals and anthologies including The Massachusetts Review, The Offing, and PANK, has she been a writer-in-residence at the Shakespeare & Company bookstore, Art Farm Nebraska, and The Vermont Studio Center, among others. A born Vermonter, she tours nationally and internationally composing poems-to-order for strangers on a 1952 Hermes Rocket typewriter.

Miriam Bird Greenberg is the author of In the Volcano's Mouth (University of Pittsburgh, 2016), winner of the 2015 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize. The recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and the Poetry Foundation, she's written about the nomads, hitchhikers, and hobos living on America's margins and crossed the continent as a hitchhiker and aboard freight trains herself. The author of two chapbooks-All night in the new country (Sixteen Rivers, 2013) and Pact-Blood, Fevergrass (Ricochet Editions, 2013), Miriam grew up on an organic farm in rural Texas, the daughter of a New York Jew and a goat-raising anthropologist involved in the back-to-the-land movement. These days she lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she teaches creative writing and ESL, helping jewelry students use laser cutters and architecture grad students wrap their heads around building information systems.

Feb 21, 7:30pm to 9:30pm, Pegasus Books Downtown, 2349 Shattuck Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704, United States

Poetry Flash presents Christopher Buckley and Gary Young



Poetry Flash presents Christopher Buckley and Gary Young


Christopher Buckley's new book of poems is Chaos Theory. Gerald Stern says, "There is a deep nostalgia here, but also wisdom and common sense, and beautiful writing. I welcome him at his maturest, poet of stardust." Author of some twenty books of poems, including Star Journal: Selected Poems, Back Room at the Philosopher's Club, Varieties of Religious Experience, and Rolling the Bones; his honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, four Pushcart Prizes, two awards from the Poetry Society of America, and two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has also edited numerous anthologies, several of them with Gary Young, including The Geography of Home: Californa's Poetry of Place and Bear Flag Republic: Prose Poems and Poetics from California.
Gary Young is the author of eight books of poems. His new collection of prose poems is That's What I Thought, winner of the 2017 Lexi Rudnitsky Editor's Choice Award. Mark Jarman says, "The warmth and honesty of Young's poems are as durable as their precision and insight." Also a printer and a book artist, his print work has been widely shown, including at the Museum of Modern Art and The Getty Center for the Arts. In 2010, he was named the first ever Poet Laureate of Santa Cruz County. Some of his honors include a 2009 Shelley Memorial Award, a Pushcart Prize, a William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Feb 21, 7:30pm to 8:30pm, The basement at Moe's 2476 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley

Berkeley Dance Project 2019: the body remembers

Joe Goode, Professor of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies\
Choreographers: Joe Goode, TDPS, Joe Goode Performance Group; Cherie Hill, IrieDance, UC Berkeley Alumna; Rulan Tangen, DANCING EARTH; Latanya Tigner, TDPS, Dimensions Dance Theater; Katie O'Connor, UC Berkeley Alumna

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of UC Berkeley's dance program, Berkeley Dance Project 2019: <em>the body remembers</em> will feature an all-student cast performing pieces by professional choreographers Joe Goode, Rulan Tangen, Latanya Tigner, and Cherie Hill, as well as recent dance program alumna Katie O'Connor.

From a "haunting" solo to a multi-dancer "mosaic," the dance pieces in BDP 2019 represent a wide range of sources and styles: Goode incorporates spoken word and song into a piece based on the buddhist concept of "the undefended heart;" Tangen presents an organic creative response to a "re-mapping" and "re-storying" of campus based on Ohlone histories and perspectives; Tigner honors researcher, instructor and choreographer Ruth Beckford, recognized as the mother of African diasporic dance in the Bay Area; Hill draws from supernatural elements of her Jamaican Maroon ancestry; and O'Connor explores the tenderness, anguish, healing and transformation inherent in caretaking.

Professor Emerita Marni Thomas Wood, co-founder of the dance program, will be on campus for a short residency, including a discussion of the dance program's history on February 21.

Feb 21, 8pm to 10pm, Zellerbach Playhouse